The Global Centre for Risk and Innovation (GCRI)

Impact Assessments

Impact Assessments are systematic analyses of the potential impacts of proposed projects on the natural and human environment to identify risks before significant decisions and commitments are made. Impact Assessments pathways consist of modular and cross-functional steps with separate rules and responsibilities, allowing interdisciplinary teams to build integrated CCell and co-create dynamic models for complex glocal issues. They aim to provide comprehensive consensus mechanisms for stakeholders in a zero-trust and bias-free environment. QH partners can run multiple assessment processes and issue CoA for WILP achievements, CoE for best practices and join commerces to accept CoI for impact-oriented projects.

Image link

Integrated Impact Assessments

Impact Assessments are a vital tool for understanding the effects of different projects and initiatives on communities, the environment, and other key stakeholders. By providing detailed information on the potential risks and benefits of various actions, impact assessments help organizations make informed decisions and develop effective strategies to promote sustainable development. One of the most effective ways to conduct impact assessments is through participatory research, policy, and development.

Participatory Impact Assessments involve engaging various stakeholders in the research, policy, and development process. This can include community members, government officials, private sector partners, and other interested parties. This approach can lead to a more inclusive and equitable process, with a broader range of perspectives and ideas being considered. Additionally, it allows organizations to leverage the resources and expertise of stakeholders to achieve a more significant impact.

Participatory impact assessments have several benefits. First, they can lead to more effective and sustainable outcomes. By engaging a wide range of stakeholders and considering their perspectives, organizations can develop solutions that are more likely to be accepted and implemented by communities, governments, and other organizations. Second, participatory impact assessments promote greater transparency and accountability. All stakeholders have the opportunity to provide input and understand the process, goals, and results of the impact assessments. This can help to build trust among stakeholders and partners and ensure that initiatives are implemented effectively. Third, by involving stakeholders throughout the impact assessment process, organizations can better understand and respond to changing needs and priorities. This approach allows for greater flexibility and adaptability, which is essential in today's rapidly changing environment.

In conclusion, providing impact assessments through participatory research, policy, and development is an effective way to understand the effects of different projects and initiatives on communities, the environment, and other key stakeholders. This approach can lead to more effective and sustainable outcomes, promote greater transparency and accountability, and enable organizations to better respond to changing needs and priorities.

GCRI provides network platforms for participatory research and innovation. These platforms can help to accelerate public participation in impact assessments, which are essential tools for understanding the effects of different projects and initiatives on communities, the environment, and other key stakeholders.

Participatory impact assessments involve engaging various stakeholders in the research, policy, and development process. This can include community members, government officials, private sector partners, and other interested parties. By providing a platform that facilitates communication and collaboration between these stakeholders, GCRI can help promote greater public participation in impact assessments.

A network platform for participatory research and innovation provides several key benefits. First, it can increase the efficiency and effectiveness of impact assessments by streamlining communication and collaboration among stakeholders. This can help reduce the time and resources required to conduct impact assessments and improve the information gathered.

Second, a network platform can increase transparency and accountability. By providing stakeholders with easy access to information about impact assessments, the platform can help to build trust and ensure that initiatives are implemented effectively. It can also help to ensure that stakeholders are aware of the outcomes and findings of the impact assessments and can make informed decisions.

Third, a network platform can help to promote greater inclusivity in impact assessments. Providing an accessible and user-friendly participation platform can help engage stakeholders who might otherwise be excluded from the process.

In conclusion, providing network platforms for participatory research and innovation is an effective way for QH stakeholders to accelerate public participation in impact assessments. It allows organizations to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of impact assessments, increase transparency and accountability, and promote greater inclusivity in the process, increasing the positive impact on the communities and the environment.

Environmental, Social, and Governance(ESG) standards and frameworks are sets of guidelines and best practices that companies can use to measure and improve their performance in areas related to the environment, social issues, and governance. Adopting and following these standards and frameworks can help companies identify risks, track progress and improve overall performance, which in turn can help attract investors, consumers, and regulators.

Compliance with these regulations is becoming increasingly important as consumers, investors, and regulators are placing greater emphasis on companies' environmental and social impact. Below is a guide to help companies understand the latest ESG regulations worldwide and develop a strategy to include stakeholders in their compliance efforts.

  1. Understand the regulations: Familiarize yourself with the latest ESG regulations in your industry and region. This may include laws and guidelines on issues such as carbon emissions, water management, labour rights, and governance practices. It is important to note that regulations can vary depending on the country, state, or industry.

  2. Assess your current practices: Conduct an internal audit of your company's ESG practices. This will help you identify areas where you are currently in compliance and areas where improvements are needed.

  3. Engage stakeholders: ESG regulations often directly impact stakeholders such as employees, customers, and local communities. It is essential to involve them in the compliance process to ensure that their concerns and perspectives are taken into account. One way to do this is to hold regular meetings or workshops with stakeholders to discuss the company's ESG practices and gather feedback.

  4. Develop an action plan: Based on your internal audit and stakeholder engagement results, develop an action plan to address any areas of non-compliance and improve your company's overall ESG performance. This should include specific targets and milestones, as well as a clear timeline for implementation.

  5. Continuously monitor and report progress: Monitor your progress and report regularly on the status of your ESG compliance. This will help you identify areas where further improvements are needed and demonstrate to stakeholders that the company is actively working to address their concerns.

The latest ESG regulations can be different by country, but some examples are:

  • In the United States, the SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) has proposed new regulations requiring companies to disclose more information about their ESG practices.
  • In the EU, The Non-Financial Reporting Directive requires companies to disclose information about their environmental and social impact, as well as their governance practices.
  • In the United Kingdom, the Financial Conduct Authority has introduced new guidance for companies to disclose information about their climate-related risks and opportunities.
  • In Japan, the Japan Securities Dealers Association has introduced new guidelines for companies to disclose information about their ESG practices.
  • In China, the National Development and Reform Commission has introduced new regulations on energy efficiency and carbon emissions for companies.

It is essential to consult with professionals or experts and be up to date with the laws and regulations of your specific region or industry. Developing a strategy to include stakeholders in your ESG compliance efforts can help you build trust, transparency, and engagement. And by monitoring and reporting your progress, you can demonstrate to stakeholders that your company is committed to operating ethically and sustainably.

Below is a list of some of the critical ESG-related laws and regulations that companies in the financial sector may need to comply with in 2023:

  1. SEC Regulation S-K Item 101(c) (United States): This regulation requires companies to disclose information about their material environmental liabilities in their annual reports.

  2. EU Non-Financial Reporting Directive (European Union): This directive requires companies to disclose information about their environmental and social impact and governance practices in their annual reports.

  3. TCFD (Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures) (Global): This framework provides guidelines for companies to disclose information about their climate-related risks and opportunities.

  4. CRD IV (Capital Requirements Directive IV) (European Union): This directive includes provisions that require banks to disclose information about the environmental and social risks associated with their lending and investment activities.

  5. SFDR (Sustainability-related Disclosure Regulation) (European Union): This regulation requires companies to disclose their sustainability risks and opportunities, including their environmental, social, and governance risks.

  6. ESG Disclosure Regulation (Japan): This regulation requires companies to disclose information about their ESG practices, including their environmental and social impact, in their annual securities reports.

  7. China's Green Credit Directive (China): This directive requires banks and other financial institutions to disclose information about their environmental and social performance as part of their credit assessment process.

  8. Environmental and Social Risk Management Directive (Japan): This Directive, set by the Financial Services Agency (FSA) of Japan, requires financial institutions to implement an environmental and social risk management framework.

It's important to note that these examples may only cover some of the regulations in place, and new regulations may emerge. It's essential to consult with experts and professionals and stay informed on the laws and regulations that apply to the specific region and industry. The rules companies need to comply with in 2023 may have changed from my knowledge cut-off.

As a non-profit organization focused on participatory research and innovation, our network is well-positioned to help stakeholders comply with Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) regulations and improve their ESG performance.

One way GCRI can help stakeholders comply with ESG regulations is through the development and implementation of LLL programs that educate and inform stakeholders about the specific requirements of these regulations. By providing stakeholders with clear, actionable information about what they need to do to comply with ESG regulations, GCRI can help reduce confusion and uncertainty, which can, in turn, help stakeholders take the necessary steps to comply with these regulations.

Additionally, GCRI can help stakeholders improve their ESG portfolio by researching and developing new technologies and practices that can positively impact the environment, society, and governance. For example, GCRI could conduct research on sustainable agricultural practices that can reduce the environmental impact of farming or develop new technologies that can help reduce carbon emissions. GCRI can help improve their ESG portfolio by sharing this research and technologies with stakeholders.

To evidence the impact of your work, GCRI uses CRS to track and measure the results of our programs and initiatives. For example, you could track the number of stakeholders that have adopted sustainable agricultural practices due to your research or the reduction in carbon emissions achieved through implementing new technologies. Collecting this data and presenting it in the form of case studies and success stories can help demonstrate the positive impact of your work on stakeholders and inspire others to adopt similar practices.

In summary, GCRI can help stakeholders comply with ESG regulations and improve their ESG scores by educating their stakeholders about these regulations, developing new technologies and practices that positively impact their communities, and tracking and measuring the impacts of their sponsored programs.

Impacts

3

Technology Impact Assessment (TIA) Level I

0%
4 Requirements

pCredits

0

Participation

Launch your projects to trusted participants in minutes and power up your pipelines with the most potent and flexible participatory mechanism built for the twin digital-green transition

eCredits

0

%

Engagement

Create comprehensive engagement pipelines that are vital to the success of your project. Understand and respond to the risks and opportunities with continuous learning modules

vCredits

0

%

Validation

Infuse pipelines to validate research, results, and reports. Establish dynamic methods capable of evaluating and increasing possibilities within research and development communities

[Accounts]

Sponsor MPM for academic projects

Sponsor MPM for sector-based industry projects

Sponsor MPM for social and community development

Sponsor MPM for the city and regional projects

Sponsor MPM for institutional projects

Sponsor MPM for public sector projects

[Areas]

Sponsor MPM pathways for research builds

Sponsor MPM paths for design builds with WILPs

Sponsor DevOps with quests, builds and bounties

Sponsor MPM paths for policy campaigns and public affairs

Sponsor MPM paths for integration with digital twins

Make systems work together with interoperation builds
[Actions]

Launch MPM for project development and management

Build and deploy products with MPM powered WILPs

Launch programs with streamlined builds and integrated CRS

Launch platform builds with integrated CCell and digital twins

Create MPM streams for network development and management

Run MPM with DICE for systems innovation

[Rewards]

Support platform credits for successful project delivery

Sponsor badges and share your portfolio anywhere

Sponsor digital certificates: CoA , CoQ , CoE , CoI

Sponsor micro-credentials for skills and competencies

Sponsor commerces and accept CoI for target campaigns

Sponsor excellence awards for community leaders

Have questions?